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Make Your Style Leading Edge – Not Bleeding Edge.

By January 21, 2013December 19th, 2016No Comments

ttb039‘Great leaders create movements by empowering the tribe to communicate. They establish the foundation for people to make connections, as opposed to commanding people to follow them.’ – Seth Godin

There is always a temptation in business to take the most ruthless approach imaginable; to take the hardcore way. To put pure profit ahead of people and the short-term win ahead of long-term working relationships.

But this kind of thinking usually ends with what I would term an intrapreunerial view of what is achievable. It means that you end up putting yourself and your business practices well and truly inside the box and closing the lid to outside thinking, influence and possibilities of change.

Instead of balancing your style on the edge of a razor, refusing to soften and show a willingness to collaborate and change – why not become someone who thinks about business with a leading edge, not a bleeding edge?

Think with agility, not lethargy – because taking an approach in business where it is just about you and not your team, or your co-workers, is a lazy approach. To include others in the decision making process can be immensely challenging – but the rewards even greater.

Take business outside the boardroom – make it an holistic experience for everyone involved. Have meetings in the park. Do one-on-one mentoring sessions at a yummy cafe. Don’t make it all about sitting across acres of intimidating wood and metal, simply because you have earned the privilege of said acres. Keep a balance and it will take you further than ten short sharp barked out e-mails ever could – or will.

There is always a yin and a yang in every situation in life. Business is no different. So why take just the dark, and shut out the light side of the equation? Be a collaborative, open and honest changemaker.

And leave the sharp edge where it belongs – with the glass ceiling and other relics of bad business habits.

In the Museum of 20th Century Corporate Practice.

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